François Auguste René Chateaubriand Bibliography

Essai historique, politique, et moral sur les révolutions 1797
Atala 1801
Atala established Chateaubriand’s literary reputation.
Le Génie du christianisme 1802
Translated into English as The Genius of Christianity in 1856.

Chateaubriand assertion that Christianity was morally and aesthetically superior to other religions had a profound influence within religious and literary circles of his time. With the aim of Romanticizing Catholicism, it appeared six days after the ratification of Napoleon’s Concordat with the Vatican and four days before the great bell of Notre Dame for the first time in ten years called the faithful to mass. As a result Chateaubriand was awarded a diplomatic appointment in Rome.

In his later years Chateaubriand - he died in 1848 - wrote his celebrated autobiography, Mémoires d’outre-tombe (Memoirs from Beyond the Tomb), which was not published in full until 1902.
René 1802
Les Martyrs 1809
Itinéraire de Paris à Jérusalem 1811
Published in three volumes. An account of Chateaubriand’s journey to Jerusalem in search of literary material. Leaving Paris in July 1806, Chateaubriand left his wife at Venice and then visited Corfu, the Peloponnese, Athens, Smyrna, Constantinople, Jerusalem, Alexandria, Carthage and Spain.
Itinéraire de Paris à Jérusalem 1811
Published in 3 Volumes, an account of Chateaubriand’s journey to Jerusalem in search of literary material. Leaving Paris in July 1806, Chateaubriand left his wife at Venice and then visited Corfu, the Peloponnese, Athens, Smyrna, Constantinople, Jerusalem, Alexandria, Carthage and Spain.
De la Monarchie selon la charte 1816
A critique of Restoration policy which led to Chateaubriand’s dismissal as a privy councillor and the loss of his main source of income.
Les Natchez 1826
Indian epic that Chateaubriand worked on during his exile in London (1793-1800). “Les Natchez (of which no more than half was ever written) is a hotchpotch of a book, sometimes tiresome, sometimes silly and often beautiful, alike in its descriptions of scenary and its depiction of human passion. Chateaubriand was a natural colourist and had learned from English poetry that colour could be admitted even to le style noble; and though he had seen very little of America he had ridden through virgin forests and slept in the tents of Indians, at a time when he saw and felt everything with the acute sensibility of youth.” (Encyclopaedia Britannica)